Sunday, November 18, 2012

Schools closed in honor of Mickey Mouse's birthday

Today is the official day The Walt Disney Company celebrates Mickey's 84th birthday. Over 50 years ago the mouse's big day was a big deal and was celebrated with birthday-related events worldwide. Now, not so much. In honor of Mickey's birthday I offer-up some publicity ads from years gone by:


The funny thing about the above ad was that schools were really closed on October 1, 1932. Just not in honor of Mickey's birthday. October 1, 1932, was a Saturday! Some clever marketing on someone's behalf, possibly Harry Hammond Beall, who was in charge of Disney Studio publicity at the time.

The following ads are from the big UA publicity campaign of 1935.






The next ad dates from 1938.


Mickey's 7th birthday bash in 1935 was a really big deal. Walt Disney's distributor, United Artists, pulled out all the stops with a huge publicity campaign. To learn more about UA's 1935 promotion and see some other cool birthday ads please visit my previous post on the topic by clicking here.

As always, click on the images to make them larger.

Saturday, November 17, 2012

The most popular character in screendom . . .

One final Columbia promotion before I start to post some great Mickey Mouse publicity ads in celebration of Mickey's 84th birthday on November 18. This one is from December 1930.


The graphics, design, and layout of this ad epitomize why I like vintage 1930s Disneyana so much.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

He talks! He sings! He dances!

As promised, here's another grouping of early Columbia Pictures Mickey Mouse cartoon advertisements. These ads began appearing in trade magazines shortly after Walt Disney signed a distribution deal with Columbia in April 1930.

Respectively, the ads date from April 6, May, 27, June 3, and June 10, 1930.





Monday, November 12, 2012

Mickey, Charlie, and Doug

In celebration of Mickey's upcoming birthday, I'm going to try and post a series of rare Mickey Mouse magazine advertisements from the 1930s over the course of the next week. 

Here's the first in the series - a Columbia Pictures promotion from February 1931:


In the spring of 1930, Walt Disney ended his business relationship with the shifty Pat Powers, a New York businessman who had been distributing the Mickey Mouse shorts starting with Steamboat Willie, and instead inked a new deal with Columbia Pictures. 

The interesting coincidence in the above ad is the fact Chaplin and Fairbanks were two of the four Hollywood legends that started up United Artists in February 1919, along with Mary Pickford and D.W. Griffith. And it just happened to be United Artists that Disney signed with to distribute his films starting in June 1932, after a falling out with Columbia.